Sleigh

Sleigh Fails in Heavy Weather

Elf News Reporter at Santa Claus LTD
Elf Meg graduated from Southern North Pole University with a degree in journalism. For several years she was a star reporter for the North Pole Gazette and then briefly served as a producer for North Pole Radio News. She brings her experience in media to North Pole Flight Command, serving as both an Elf News Reporter for North Pole Radio News and Managing Editor of North Pole Flight Command.com
Elf Meg Nogg
Latest posts by Elf Meg Nogg (see all)

It has been a rough year testing the new design of Santa’s sleigh. Today Santa’s Sleigh has been in the hurricane zone of the southeast of the United States, where Hurricane Ian has made landfall in Florida. It was planned for the sleigh to be tested by the heavy weather.

It failed.

There’s no two ways about it. This sleigh, with it’s present design, cannot fly in horrible weather.

It needs to be able to face any weather conditions on earth – both for the safety of Santa and of the reindeer.

So all 12 test sleighs were sent into the hurricane zone under different conditions – loaded, empty, partially loaded, high altitude, low altitude, high speed, low speed, etc.

The sleigh failed in every instance.

Test pilots have not been ordered out of the hurricane zone but they have been limited in their assignments for now.

A new design of the sleigh was underway anyway and a new version is being rushed to the zone tomorrow. Test flights will continue as they bring in the new version of the sleigh to take advantage of the unsettled weather the hurricane provides.

Sometime in the coming days, the new sleigh version will head to another sector for continued testing.

It is not known if another opportunity for heavy weather testing will become available. But with each version of the sleigh that is released they basically have to restart the flight routine anyway. There will be future storms before Christmas and we are certain flight command will again chase those storms. A hurricane, such as Ian, is a rare opportunity in sleigh test flights.

Fortunately, this storm showed vulnerabilities of the current sleigh that needed to surface. Even though we say the sleigh failed it’s a good thing it was discovered. This moves the process of getting a working design for Santa by Christmas forward.

Sleigh test pilots are anxious to try the newest version.

Sleighs

Sleighs Continue Mad Dash Eastward

Elf News Reporter at Santa Claus LTD
Elf Meg graduated from Southern North Pole University with a degree in journalism. For several years she was a star reporter for the North Pole Gazette and then briefly served as a producer for North Pole Radio News. She brings her experience in media to North Pole Flight Command, serving as both an Elf News Reporter for North Pole Radio News and Managing Editor of North Pole Flight Command.com
Elf Meg Nogg
Latest posts by Elf Meg Nogg (see all)

The caravan of sleighs – ultimately heading for retirement at the North Pole – are doing their last bit of test service on this, their 2nd day, of extended flight.

The plan is for them to push over the Regional Tracking Center at Wiseman’s Creek in Australia before taking a long route north over the Pacific Ocean to visit Sector 5. We are uncertain of their exact flight plan but know that in time they will fly over the Regional Tracking Center in Mistletoe, Kentucky.

It is assumed that the long course towards Australia, over the Pacific and then the entirety of Sector 5 will take most of the day, if not all of it. It’s an ambitious flight plan. We do not know when they are stopping or where they will be staying the night. (It certainly will not be in Mistletoe, Kentucky. There are no facilities there to house sleighs, test pilots or reindeer).

The next day, which we believe will be the final leg of this long journey, should take them to the North Pole, where our test flight teams will be paired up with new sleighs. Those new sleighs are of a corrected design.

Those new sleighs will leave, presumably after another day or two, and head to a new theater of action, where a more traditional flight plan will be planned.

Once we know of those plans, we will inform you.

Flight

Flight Takes a Breather

Elf News Reporter at Santa Claus LTD
Elf Meg graduated from Southern North Pole University with a degree in journalism. For several years she was a star reporter for the North Pole Gazette and then briefly served as a producer for North Pole Radio News. She brings her experience in media to North Pole Flight Command, serving as both an Elf News Reporter for North Pole Radio News and Managing Editor of North Pole Flight Command.com
Elf Meg Nogg
Latest posts by Elf Meg Nogg (see all)

After more than 20-continuous hours in flight the test flight caravan of 11 sleighs has paused for the next 8 hours at least. They have landed on the deck of the SS Tannenbaum, which is on duty in the Indian Ocean.

Nearly 20 hours ago the flights resumed in the South Pacific, heading east first to Milagro, Ecuador. From there they crossed over South America and over the South Atlantic before appearing in the skies over Sector 3’s regional tracking center in Bethlehem, South Africa.

Then they broke north through Ethiopia and into Palestine, where they did a flyby of the Regional Tracking Center in Bethlehem, just east of Jerusalem in Israel. Continuing south and east they just landed in the Indian Ocean to end their day.

When flights resume tomorrow it is believed they will head east towards Australia.

Their flight schedule after that has not yet been determined.

We will keep you informed.

Test Flights

Test Flights to Resume

Elf News Reporter at Santa Claus LTD
Elf Meg graduated from Southern North Pole University with a degree in journalism. For several years she was a star reporter for the North Pole Gazette and then briefly served as a producer for North Pole Radio News. She brings her experience in media to North Pole Flight Command, serving as both an Elf News Reporter for North Pole Radio News and Managing Editor of North Pole Flight Command.com
Elf Meg Nogg
Latest posts by Elf Meg Nogg (see all)

As rumored all day today North Pole Flight Command is clearing the flight schedule for test flights of Santa’s sleigh to resume. All operable sleighs will take off from the deck of the SS Jingle Bell, anchored in the South Pacific, within the next few hours.

Those tracking the sleigh – mostly tracker elves via SantaTrackers.net – will see a much fast track of the sleighs over the next few hours.

The sleighs will be performing what is called a repositioning exercise. This is a change from one part of the world to another for the next few weeks.

Complicating this repositioning effort is a change to the next generation of this year’s sleigh design. As we reported yesterday, the cause of this week’s sleigh crash was determined to be a defect in the design. This defect has been corrected and 12 new sleighs have been ordered and are just about ready to deliver for additional testing.

Therefore, the repositioning of the test flight theater will correspond to the activation of these new sleighs.

Also, as part of the test flight program, the fast-step repositioning and replacement of the sleighs will also correspond with communication coordination tests with each Regional Tracking Center. This is why elves in each Sector were put on high alert today.

The test pattern – while advanced in speed in a process we call “fast-step” will see the sleigh move quickly from sector to sector over the next 72 hours. They will at the end of their fast run head to the North Pole.

While there, the first generation of test sleighs (11 of them now), will be retired.

While at the North Pole test pilots and reindeer will be outfitted to the replacement sleighs and therefrom head to the new theater of action.

We do not yet know where those first test flights in the new sleighs will happen. By Thursday or Friday of this upcoming week, we should know.