Mapping Australia

Mapping Australia

Elf News Reporter at Santa Claus LTD
Elf Meg graduated from Southern North Pole University with a degree in journalism. For several years she was a star reporter for the North Pole Gazette and then briefly served as a producer for North Pole Radio News. She brings her experience in media to North Pole Flight Command, serving as both an Elf News Reporter for North Pole Radio News and Managing Editor of North Pole Flight Command.com
Elf Meg Nogg
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Mapping parts of Australia has become a new mission of Santa’s sleigh this week. As test flights have repositioned over Sector 1 this special mission has become a priority.

“Mapping is an ongoing project that gets worked on daily all over the world.” explained North Pole Flight Director Elf Buck Sanchez. “The world is constantly changing. New roads and development happen. People move. Landmarks change. Santa has to keep up with everything so we use a variety of means to map every part of the earth. Santa needs the latest of this information.”

While the use of Santa’s sleigh is not normally part of the mapping efforts at the North Pole it is especially useful for not only helping the mapping effort but also for low altitude flights of Santa’s sleigh. Mapping requires low and slow work by the sleigh and given the weather in Australia right now this is the perfect mission for them.

“These flight are during daylight hours,” explained Elf Supervisor Randi Hume. “That means anyone can see these flight and it is likely a lot of people will see the sleigh. It’s a great opportunity for tracker elves and Santa fans alike. Santa, of course, will not be piloting these flights but how often do you get to see Santa’s sleigh in broad daylight?”

We suspect these flights over Australia will last for three or four days.

Test Flights

Test Flights Ending in Sector 3

Elf News Reporter at Santa Claus LTD
Elf Meg graduated from Southern North Pole University with a degree in journalism. For several years she was a star reporter for the North Pole Gazette and then briefly served as a producer for North Pole Radio News. She brings her experience in media to North Pole Flight Command, serving as both an Elf News Reporter for North Pole Radio News and Managing Editor of North Pole Flight Command.com
Elf Meg Nogg
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After nearly a month with a heavy test flight schedule over the skies of Sector 3 Santa’s sleigh is shifting soon to a new field of operations.

Flight Command announced this morning that the test flights of Santa’s sleigh are heading soon to Sector 1 for an extended period of time.

Sector 1 has a lot of open ocean areas. It is one of the most challenging parts of the world to fly a sleigh.

Sleighs, as you know, are primarily designed for travel in the snow and snow is impossible to find in Sector 1. Of course, Santa’s sleigh is a flying sleigh, so it’s a little different. Ocean winds and landing zones are all different. There will be a big emphasis in testing the sleigh in particular with landing capabilities.

In addition, the sleigh over the course of the next several weeks will be mapping certain areas of the sectors where it flies. The mapping part of the test flights of Santa’s sleigh is something that always requires updating. Santa likes to use photography from sleigh flights instead of satellite imaging because he can get better detail under specific weather conditions. Unlike traditional aerial mapping Santa’s need for the look of certain areas under specific weather conditions is kind of critical.

We will update you as well in the weeks to come of work being done with the North Pole Navy.

Santa's Sleigh End August in Sector 5

Santa’s Sleigh Ends August in Sector 5

Elf News Reporter at Santa Claus LTD
Elf Meg graduated from Southern North Pole University with a degree in journalism. For several years she was a star reporter for the North Pole Gazette and then briefly served as a producer for North Pole Radio News. She brings her experience in media to North Pole Flight Command, serving as both an Elf News Reporter for North Pole Radio News and Managing Editor of North Pole Flight Command.com
Elf Meg Nogg
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Santa’s sleigh will end August in Sector 5, performing maneuvers in the USA and Canada before heading somewhere else in September.

Flight analysts are very excited with the progress of the sleigh. Tests are being conducted at what is described as “extreme speeds” and are going so well many are predicting a new possible speed record for Santa this year if weather conditions are favorable.

Flight tests for September are still being planned. The recent return of reindeer to the North Pole gives flight test engineers greater flexibility.

It could be said that Santa’s sleigh is ahead of schedule at this point and that all conditions are favorable for Santa’s flight so far.

Test Flights

Test Flights to Resume Over the Pacific

Elf News Reporter at Santa Claus LTD
Elf Meg graduated from Southern North Pole University with a degree in journalism. For several years she was a star reporter for the North Pole Gazette and then briefly served as a producer for North Pole Radio News. She brings her experience in media to North Pole Flight Command, serving as both an Elf News Reporter for North Pole Radio News and Managing Editor of North Pole Flight Command.com
Elf Meg Nogg
Latest posts by Elf Meg Nogg (see all)

Santa’s sleigh is on its way to the Pacific ocean for more test flights. New software has been completely installed and stabilized so it is time now to test it in flight.

Engineers say they will begin with high altitude speed tests along the coast of South America before heading to China later for load tests.

Tracking command for this new series of flights will shift to the North Pole Navy Command ship Jingle Bell, stationed somewhere in the Northern Pacific.

We do expect tracking command to shift to Sector 2 sometime in the next week as flights will for a time be centered over Asia.

As a reminder, you can follow the Santa Tracker at SantaTrackers.net for live data relative to all test flights.